Basic English Grammar for SSC Banking and Railway Exams

INTRODUCTION

English is a subject of language. And like any other language, there are basic rules of grammar that needs to be followed while learning any language.

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To learn English, the three basic requirements are:

Know the Basic Rules of the English Grammar

Learn as much vocabulary as possible.

Practice, practice and practice.

English language plays a very determining part in any government exam. If you’re aspiring for any such examination, you need to have a good command over English language.

In this course, we are going to build your concepts for a strong hold on English. And apart from that, we will provide a lot of questions for thorough practice.

Phrase

It is a group of words that have meaning. Or it is a group of related words.

Example: in the corner;

On the roof;

In the room

To eat dinner

Clause

A clause is a group of related words that contains a subject and verb.

Independent clause – it is a complete sentence; can stand alone by itself.

Dependent (subordinate) clause– it expresses only a part of thought; it cannot stand alone as a sentence. It is a group of words that forms a part of a sentence and has a subject and a finite verb of its own.

How to find the type of Clause?

Clause can form a part of sentence or it could be a complete sentence in itself.

Example:  Sita had a long career but she is remembered mainly for her early work.

The above sentence has 2 clauses.

Clause 1: Sita had a long career.

Clause 2: But she is remembered mainly for her early work.

Every sentence contains at least one main clause.

Main Clause: A main clause then may form a part of Complex or Compound sentences. But it also makes sense on its own.

Example: Varun was eating a hot dog.

Subordinate Clause: A subordinate clause depends on a main clause for its meaning.

**Together with main clause, a subordinate clause forms a part of a Complex sentence. **

Sentence

A sentence is an independent clause that may or may not be combined with other clauses to convey a complete and sometimes complex thought. Or it is a group of words that has a definite meaning and contains a Subject and Finite verb.

Example: He is in the corner;

She is on the roof;

Father was in the room

Structure of Sentences

Simple Sentence

Compound Sentence: Two or more main clause connected using Coordinate Conjunctions.

Complex Sentence: Principal Clause is connected with one or more subordinate clause using subordinate conjunction.

How to find the ‘Subject’?

Verb + who? Will answer the Subject

How to find the ‘Object’?

Verb + What? Or Whom? Will answer the Object.

Generally, an Indirect object comes before a Direct object.

If a direct object comes before indirect object, then it is mandatory to put – ‘to’, ‘of’ or ‘for’ before Indirect object.

Types of Sentences

  1. Assertive

Affirmative

Subject + Verb + Object

Subject + Helping Verb + Main Verb + Object

Negative

Subject + Helping Verb + Not + Main Verb + Object

  1. Interrogative

Yes/No

Helping Verb + Subject + Main Verb + Object?

Not before Main Verb in Negative sentences.

Example: Do you know his name?

Descriptive

Wh + Helping Verb + Subject + Main Verb + Object?

Wh – Wh family words.

Not before main verb

Example: Why do you not play well?

Imperative

Starts with First form of Verb – Come here

Starts with Let – Let me go

Starts with Don’t – Don’t talk in the class

Exclamatory

!

We won the match!

Optative

Starts with ‘May’ – Bless or Curse

May god bless you!

Tips:

The subject of a sentence will Never be in a prepositional phrase.

There is a Subject and Verb on both sides of the Conjunction and Semicolon.

Direct Object: non-living

Indirect Object: Living

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