HDR- Everything You Should Know About It

HDR, most of the TVs, cameras, or most of the other devices talk about HDR quality. But do you understand what HDR exactly means? The chances are that you find this specification of your device useless, and something that is not meant for you. But hey, HDR is an incredible technology that can pull out more incredible visuals. Its functions could be complicated but it is not rocket science for sure.

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So, here we are, to tell you everything you need to know about HDR. Read this article to learn about a cool piece of tech, so the next you purchase a device, you will have a complete understanding of its specs.

What Is HDR?

HDR ( High Dynamic Range), provides greater brightness, contrast, and color accuracy to both video and still images. The improved white to black ratio onscreen makes the darker parts of an image look dim, and brighten the lit regions. This technology became significant after the jump from SD to HD in the devices.

HDR 10 vs. HDR 10+ vs. Dolby Vision

These days most of the TV sets are available with the primary version of HDR known as HDR 10, where 10 refers to the 10 bits of color that HDR is proficient to display.

Alongside HDR 10, you will come across Dolby Vision (dynamic scene coloring), which has similarly competent features and specifications, plus, the scene-by-scene dynamic color shaping. Although both these technologies are the same in terms of light and dark color contrast. But Dolby Vision allows cinematographers and colorists to change the level of HDR in each scene, instead of a single color spec running throughout the entire show or movie.

As the market becomes more competitive, users get more features in a single device. Much like HDR 10+ that has all the features you get with Dolby Vision at a cheaper price.

How Do You View HDR?

Currently, there are two ways to view HDR. You can either use a UHD 4K Blu-Ray player or simply use streaming services like Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu on a compatible device.

However, the format war did not let Netflix enjoy the whole game. Some of the popular shows like Glow are working only with Dolby Vision sets, while other Netflix originals run in HDR 10.

What to Look for in HDR Support

When you dig into the specifications of a monitor or a TV, you will see one monitor supports HDRi, another supports HDR10, another supports DisplayHDR 400. So, what do these specs mean? And how do they make a difference?

When you check these specifications, you will notice maximum supported brightness changes with the HDR type. For example,

  • The monitor with HDRi support offers a maximum brightness of 350 nits.
  • Other monitors with HDR10 support offer a maximum brightness of 300 nits.
  • Another monitor with DisplayHDR 400 offers a maximum brightness of 400 nits.

As you can see, monitors with higher HDR spec do not offer any better HDR performance.

So, when it comes to identifying which scene is going to give you a good HDR experience, you must look for maximum brightness it can provide. You should look for panels with a maximum brightness of 1000 nits to pull off the HDR effect.

We hope now these specifications of your devices make sense to you, and help pick the best one.

Robert Hunt is a self-professed security expert; he has been making the people aware of the security threats. His passion is to write about Cybersecurity, cryptography, malware, social engineering, internet, and new media. He writes for Norton security products at office.com/setup

Source: https://internet-blogs.com/hdr-everything-you-should-know-about-it/

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