Rising Phoenix Might Cheer You Up If You are Missing the Cancelled Japan Olympics

Rising Phoenix is a profoundly engaging documentary about Paralympics games and tells a compelling story about achievers who fought their way through their disabilities and emerged as a deserving winner on the other side.

The documentary directed by Ian Bonhote and Peter Ettedgui is an awe-inspiring spectacle that celebrates the spirit of athleticism.

 

The ongoing pandemic made the world come to a standstill. Though some sporting events such as UCL, NBA, UFC did return, they are being played behind closed doors, and things are not exactly the same as they were before. The ongoing crisis eliminated a major player out of the equation; audience.

Games played in an empty stadium not only deposit a heavy blow to the economy of the game but also distorts the atmosphere of the game, which is an essential part of the persona of any athletic game.

However, the documentary “Rising Phoenix” will make your time worthwhile if you choose to watch it. The documentary created by Ian Bonhote and Peter Ettedgui is very delicately made. The documentary has made an impression of an accurate depiction of suffering and perseverance and that makes it a visceral experience despite the fact that no exaggeration has been made. The athletes have lived through their suffering, rebelled against it, and at the end have achieved something remarkable.

Although the documentary is not a live game demonstration, you would experience so many different emotions that you will be compelled to feel as if you are inside the game.

The documentary features Prince William, who provides narration to the story. William who has been an advocate of Paralympics for quite some time now introduces an account of the athletes who did not treat their disabilities as a curse but instead treated it as a blessing and turned it into an asset.

The documentary also features Tatyana McFadden who competed in T54. McFadden, who is a well-built strong-minded competitor, has a condition of spina bifida but that didn’t stop her from killing it at T54.

Jean-Baptiste Alaize is a French national having his roots in Burundi (an East African country). He has competed in a sprint and long jump. Directors should receive accolades on how sensitively they touched upon his tragic story when talking about his passion for the long jump.

Every athlete is the star of the show, but Bebe Vio’s part captured a considerable amount of attention when compared to others. She is a gold medal winner from 2016 Paralympics games held at Rio de Janeiro. She suffered from a severe case of meningitis since the age of 11, but the supreme confidence and talent of the woman can be seen in the documentary.

The filmmaker duo’s approach to this documentary is akin to their approach with “McQueen” a documentary on the life of Alexander McQueen; they have used interviews as well as the footage from previous Paralympics Games to add more depth and realness to their story.

Although the filmmakers haven’t exaggerated the story, they have added some CGI to give a cinematic feel to the real-life events.

The film will move you to think deeply, but it is not a tragic story. If you are an emotional person who believes in fairy tales, then you might feel that your eyes have welled up, but it will be due to scintillating joy, not grief. It also touches upon the social message of human rights, but in its very pure form, it is just a sterling piece of art that brings forward human endeavor in its apex form.

Source:-  Rising Phoenix 

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